Negotiate Overcoming early job-insecurity in Europe

How does early job insecurity impact later labour market outcomes?

Young people walking in street. Photo: colourbox.com

While the Greece and Bulgarian employers show less concern about unemployment spells in job applicants’ CVs, Norwegian and Swiss employers show stricter evaluations in regard of experienced unemployment, which in turn may negatively impact the employment chances for the concerned applicants.

Since the completion of the NEGOTIATE recruiter survey in the four countries Bulgaria, Greece, Norway and Switzerland, the Swiss team has been working on multiple analyses using the data gained from the factorial survey experiment.

Results of these research projects have been presented at various conferences: the Conference XXIIIèmes Journées du Longitudinal (JDL) at University of Rennes, the Occupations and Social Inequality (COSI) conference at IAB in Nuremberg, the European Consortium for Sociological Research (ESCR) conference at Bocconi University and the conference of the International Working Party on Labour Market Segmentation (IWPLMS) at University of Manchester.

The XXIIIèmes JDL conference was hold at University of Rennes from the 8th to the 9th of December 2016. Christian Imdorf and Lulu Shi from the University of Basel presented their first findings on “How unemployment scarring hits skilled young workers. Evidence from a factorial survey with Swiss recruiters“. The paper addresses the question, who is penalised the most by experienced unemployment in the Swiss labour market.

At the international COSI conference (29th/30th of June 2017, Federal Employment Agency in Nuremberg), that has addressed the question whether and how occupations (re-)produce social inequalities, Lulu Shi from NEGOTIATE and Ariane Bertogg from the University of Konstanz presented preliminary results on “Field-specific recruitment practices: How does unemployment affect later employment chances? A factorial survey design”. The main aim of the paper is to investigate whether employers evaluate experienced unemployment differently across different occupational fields in Switzerland.

Lulu Shi, Christian Imdorf and Rumiana Stoilova finally presented the cross-country comparative results from the factorial survey experiment of the survey at the ESCR 2017 conference at Bocconi University in Milan and at the IWPLMS at the University of Manchester. One of the main aims of their presentation titled “How does early job insecurity impact later labour market outcomes in different European countries?” was to show that there are remarkable cross-countries differences in employer’s evaluation of experienced job insecurity in individual’s career: While the Greece and Bulgarian employers show less concern about unemployment spells in job applicants’ CVs, Norwegian and Swiss employers show stricter evaluations in regard of experienced unemployment, which in turn may negatively impact the employment chances for the concerned applicants.

Written by Lulu Shi and Christian Imdorf

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Greta Juul
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